About PrEP ? PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) can reduce your chance of getting HIV from sex or injection drug use. When taken as prescribed, PrEP is highly effective for preventing HIV.

For more information please visit https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html

Are there different types of PrEP Medications

Truvada® is for all people at risk through sex or injection drug use.

Descovy® is for people at risk through sex, except for people assigned female at birth who are at risk of getting HIV from vaginal sex.

APRETUDE is the first and only long-acting injectable PrEP option.

Is PrEP safe?

PrEP is safe but some people may experience side effects like diarrhea, nausea, headache, fatigue, and stomach pain. These side effects usually go away over time.

Clinicians are available for you to ask questions about routine clinical care, laboratory testing, and the most common side effects.  

Learn more about side effects from TruvadaDescovy, and APRETUDE.

 

 

Is PrEP Effective?

  • PrEP is highly effective for preventing HIV.

  • PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken as prescribed.

  •  Although there is less information about how effective PrEP pills are among people who inject drugs, we know that PrEP pills reduce the risk of getting HIV by at least 74% when taken as prescribed. Currently, PrEP shots are not recommended for people who inject drugs.

  • PrEP is less effective when not taken as prescribed.

 

How long does PrEP take to work?

  • For receptive anal sex (bottoming), PrEP pills reach maximum protection from HIV at about 7 days of daily use.

  • For receptive vaginal sex and injection drug use, PrEP pills reach maximum protection at about 21 days of daily use.

  • No data are available for PrEP pill effectiveness for insertive anal sex (topping) or insertive vaginal sex.

  • We don’t know how long it takes for PrEP shots to reach maximum protection during sex.

 

How can I pay for PrEP

Most insurance plans and state Medicaid programs cover PrEP. Under the Affordable Care Act, PrEP must be free under almost all health insurance plans. That means you can’t be charged for your PrEP medication or the clinic visits and lab tests you need to maintain your prescription.

 

If you don’t have insurance or Medicaid coverage, there are other programs that provide PrEP for free or at a reduced cost:    

Ready, Set, PrEP makes PrEP medication available at no cost to those who qualify.

Co-pay assistance programs help lower the costs of PrEP medications. Income is not a factor in eligibility.

ViiVConnect offers a program to help pay for PrEP shots.

Some states have PrEP assistance programs. Some programs cover PrEP medication, while others cover clinical visits and lab tests. Some programs cover both.

 

Paying for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP):

Insured

Uninsured